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An illustration of the dinoflagellate (Dn) Protoperidinium depressum feeding on a chain of diatoms (Dt) using a pallium, a retractile organelle that spreads over the long spines of diatoms so that the contents can be digested.
Yes… dinoflagellates (microalgaes) can prey on diatoms (another microalgaes).. 

Illustration by D. M. Jacobson

An illustration of the dinoflagellate (Dn) Protoperidinium depressum feeding on a chain of diatoms (Dt) using a pallium, a retractile organelle that spreads over the long spines of diatoms so that the contents can be digested.

Yes… dinoflagellates (microalgaes) can prey on diatoms (another microalgaes).. 

Giant grey weeds (Lessonia spicata)  ”lifted” off the coast near Bio Bio river mouth, Chile.
Algae discolored and incomplete due to coastal uplift of 3 meters are commonly visible after the earthquake of February 27, 2010 ( having a magnitude of 8.8, is one of the most energetic earthquake ever measured in the world) This species algae usually live between 5 to 20 meters deep.
Photo by Erasmo Macaya

Giant grey weeds (Lessonia spicata)  ”lifted” off the coast near Bio Bio river mouth, Chile.

Algae discolored and incomplete due to coastal uplift of 3 meters are commonly visible after the earthquake of February 27, 2010 ( having a magnitude of 8.8, is one of the most energetic earthquake ever measured in the world) This species algae usually live between 5 to 20 meters deep.

  • Photo by Erasmo Macaya
➜ Nearly a thousand environmental activists murdered since 2002
UNIQUE ECOSYSTEM: Life of a piece of sunken wood

Wood falls on the deep-sea floor represent a significant source of energy into the food-limited deep sea. Unique communities of primarily wood- and sulfide-obligate species form on these wood falls. However, little is known regarding patterns and drivers of variation in the composition of wood fall communities through space and time, and thus, how wood falls contribute to deep-sea biodiversity.
All the wood that makes its way into the world’s oceans is also a potential home to sea creatures. Every log or piece of lumber washed away by flooding or dumped by humans has the potential to host its own community, and the diversity of those communities can be surprisingly different from log to log. Even two pieces of wood of the same species left under the same circumstances can end up with dramatically different worlds of organisms living on them.
Wood-boring clams are among the first creatures to settle on wood underwater. They have jawlike shells that help them to burrow and gut bacteria that assist in the digestion of cellulose.

More: SCIENCE NEWS
Reference (Open Access) McClain & Barry.2014. Beta-diversity on deep-sea wood falls reflects gradients in energy availability
Photo: Wood-boring bivalve from subfamily Xylophagainae by McClain

UNIQUE ECOSYSTEM: Life of a piece of sunken wood

Wood falls on the deep-sea floor represent a significant source of energy into the food-limited deep sea. Unique communities of primarily wood- and sulfide-obligate species form on these wood falls. However, little is known regarding patterns and drivers of variation in the composition of wood fall communities through space and time, and thus, how wood falls contribute to deep-sea biodiversity.

All the wood that makes its way into the world’s oceans is also a potential home to sea creatures. Every log or piece of lumber washed away by flooding or dumped by humans has the potential to host its own community, and the diversity of those communities can be surprisingly different from log to log. Even two pieces of wood of the same species left under the same circumstances can end up with dramatically different worlds of organisms living on them.

Wood-boring clams are among the first creatures to settle on wood underwater. They have jawlike shells that help them to burrow and gut bacteria that assist in the digestion of cellulose.

Bureo - Developing skateboards for a cleaner sea! 

The first skateboard made ​​of recycled nets along the coast of Chile! Find out more at https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1606305399/bureo-recycled-fishnet-skateboards-for-cleaner-oce?ref=live

time ago I did this humpback as everything I do, never finished

time ago I did this humpback as everything I do, never finished

zerostatereflex:

Drones Over Dolphin Stampede and Whales off Dana Point

"Captain Dave Anderson of Capt. Dave’s Dolphin and Whale Safari in Dana Point, California, at great personal risk, has recently filmed and edited a 5-minute video that contains some of the most beautiful, jaw-dropping, footage ever taken with a drone from the air of a huge mega-pod of thousands of common dolphins stampeding off Dana Point, California, three gray whales migrating together down the coast off San Clemente, California, and heartwarming close-ups hovering over a newborn Humpback whale calf snuggling and playing with its mom as an escort whale stands guard nearby, filmed recently in Maui."

Drones have really received a bad wrap, as of course there are many negatives involved. THIS is how you can use a drone to capture something beautiful.

HEY OBAMA, THIS IS A NON LETHAL USE FOR DRONE! TAKE NOTE

(vía fightingforwhales)

A Scripp’s Murrelet chick (formerly Xantus’s Murrelet) from Anacapa Island! This species breeds only on a handful of islands off the coast of southern California and Baja California, Mexico. This rare seabird is listed as Threatened by the state of California and as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IC helped increase the Scripp’s Murrelet population by restoring it’s breeding habitat on Anacapa Island in 2002-2003.
via Island Conservation

A Scripp’s Murrelet chick (formerly Xantus’s Murrelet) from Anacapa Island! This species breeds only on a handful of islands off the coast of southern California and Baja California, Mexico. This rare seabird is listed as Threatened by the state of California and as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IC helped increase the Scripp’s Murrelet population by restoring it’s breeding habitat on Anacapa Island in 2002-2003.

A cute Ashy Storm Petrel (Oceanodroma homochroa) chick. The presence of this Endangered bird on Anacapa island for the first time ever recorded, is a true indication of ecosystem recovery following the removal of invasive rats from the island in 2002-2003 by IC,Channel Islands National Park, and other partners.
Photo: Annie Schmidt
via Island Conservation

A cute Ashy Storm Petrel (Oceanodroma homochroa) chick. The presence of this Endangered bird on Anacapa island for the first time ever recorded, is a true indication of ecosystem recovery following the removal of invasive rats from the island in 2002-2003 by IC,Channel Islands National Park, and other partners.

laboratoryequipment:

Fish from Acidic Waters Less Able to SmellFish living on coral reefs where carbon dioxide seeps from the ocean floor are less able to detect predator odor than fish from normal coral reefs, according to a new study.The study confirms laboratory experiments showing that the behavior of reef fishes can be seriously affected by increased carbon dioxide concentrations in the ocean. The new study is the first to analyze the sensory impairment of fish from CO2 seeps, where pH is similar to what climate models forecast for surface waters by the turn of the century.
Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/fish-acidic-waters-less-able-smell

laboratoryequipment:

Fish from Acidic Waters Less Able to Smell

Fish living on coral reefs where carbon dioxide seeps from the ocean floor are less able to detect predator odor than fish from normal coral reefs, according to a new study.

The study confirms laboratory experiments showing that the behavior of reef fishes can be seriously affected by increased carbon dioxide concentrations in the ocean. The new study is the first to analyze the sensory impairment of fish from CO2 seeps, where pH is similar to what climate models forecast for surface waters by the turn of the century.

The difference: Blue whale, grey whale and a school bus
by Phil Loubere

The difference: Blue whale, grey whale and a school bus

  • by Phil Loubere

(vía freedomforwhales)

akiquezstuff: hola!! soy de mexico estoy pensando en estudiar biologia marina . y quisiera saber que tanta demanda tiene aqui en latinoamerica . a lo que me refiero es que si podre trabajar de biologo en el mar , animales , estudiar plantas etc y no terminar haciendo otra cosa que no te ga nada que ver con la biologia marina... espero y aclares mi duda

Esa es la gran pregunta que me hacen mis amigos, y familiares. En Latinoamerica hay ciertos paises con gran impulso en las ciencias, lo son Brazil, Chile y Mexico, ahora, ser biólogo marino es un gran campo, desde la microbiología marina hasta el estudio de cetáceos, oceanografía, todo depende de tu enfoque y claro, de tus ganas. Eso se ve a medida que exploras las diferentes áreas, yo he probado de casi todo, y así descarté las que no me gustaban.

En mi caso, no me interesa hacerme millonario trabajando, espero conseguir un trabajo inspirador, que me haga feliz,  con una amiga planeamos, que de no lograr un trabajo, o post estudios, nos iremos a buscar voluntariados en algún país del mundo, donde nos paguen con comida y techo.

quien sabe? todo depende de ti, de tus ganas y pasión

Sí tengo algun seguidor mexicano, que estudie biología marina, comunicate con 

ftcreature:

The Featured Creature: Black Dragonfish: From Googly-eyed Spaghetti to Deep-sea Monster

Looking at the drawing above, you’re probably thinking it’s from some Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy… there’s no way that could be an actual creature on Earth… right?

Wrong. This baby (no pun intended) is as real as they come. It’s the larval form of a Black Dragonfish or Ribbon Sawtail Fish (Idiacanthus fasciola), which is found around the world at depths of 500 to 2,000 meters. These fish go through an incredible metamorphosis from larva, postlarva, adolescent, transitional adolescent to adult. 

Read the full article for more! 

one day I will live in your nightmares 

(vía mucholderthen)

venomouswalrus:

THOSE TEETH! HANDS DOWN COOLEST TEETH!

From Chicago Adventure, Part Three: Little Skeletons

trynottodrown:

Juvenile Oarfish
THEME BY PARTI