Look at this marine avian dinosaur!!!!! Giant Petrels (genus Macronectes) consists of two species. They are very aggresive predators. Both southern and northern giant petrel feed on krillsquid, fish, other small seabirds, and carcasses of marine mammals. Northern giant petrel scavenge and prey on seal pups and placentae, penguins and albatross. However, they rely more heavily on fish during winter months.

Is know that these birds kill hundreds of Rockhoppers a year sometimes just for pleasure (comment by  Tristan da Cunha Conservation Department

mucholderthen

freedomforwhales:

On July 29th, a whale was reported in distress at the entrance to Halifax harbour. Upon arrival, we found a minke whale bobbing vertically in the water with its tongue completely swollen. Based on the small size of the animal, it may have been still dependent on its mother, which was nowhere to be seen. Due to its young age and severe injury, the animal was unlikely to survive. After consulting with veterinarians, representatives from MARS, DFO and DNR responded the following day to determine the best course of action for this young whale, but found that it had died overnight. While retrieving the carcass we discovered it had been entangled in some old, lost fishing gear. The carcass was taken to the Agricultural College in Truro where a necropsy was conducted. We found that there were signs of a physical injury to the animals jaw. It’s possible, while anchored by the fishing gear, the animal was hit by a vessel causing its tongue to swell. The remains were left at the Agricultural College for a study on composting.

Source

Just another example of our trashing the ocean damaging and killing its inhabitants. 

DISPOSE OF YOUR FISHING GEAR PROPERLY, PLEASE. IT’S REALLY NOT THAT HARD.

OVER 9K SPECIES SHOW FIRTS ATLAS OF MARINE LIFE FROM ANTARCTICA

Details about the marine life of 9000 species that inhabit Antarctica, from tiny microbes to large cetaceans were collected for the first time in an atlas on the remote and icy southern seas.

The Biogeographic Atlas of the Southern Ocean was developed over four years by an international team of marine biologists and oceanographers and contributions of more than a hundred scientists from Australia, New Zealand, USA, France, Belgium, Spain or Chile.

This work, coordinated by the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR) and presented at a scientific conference held in New Zealand this week, contains 66 chapters, complete and comprehensive data of some 9,000 species and 800 maps and 100 color photographs. Researcher compiled data on the occurrence, evolution, genetic changes and effects of climate change on all of them.

  • The database described from microorganisms to large cetaceans
  • Over a hundred of scientists have worked on the atlas for four years
  • Still fall outside the description 1,000 to 2,000 species
  • First chapter is available free
  • MORE iATLAS

ANTÁRTICA: SOBRE 9000 ESPECIES DOCUMENTADAS EN EL CONTINENTE BLANCO.

Los detalles sobre la vida marina de 9 mil especies que habitan la Antártida, desde minúsculos microbios hasta enormes cetáceos, han sido recogidos por primera vez en un atlas sobre los remotos y helados mares meridionales.

El ‘Atlas biogeográfico del Océano Austral’ fue elaborado durante cuatro años por un equipo internacional de biólogos marinos y oceanógrafos y aportaciones de más de un centenar de científicos de Australia, Nueva Zelanda, Estados Unidos, Francia, Bélgica, España o Chile.

Esta obra, coordinada por el el Comité Científico de la Investigación sobre el Antártico (SCAR) y presentada en una conferencia científica celebrada en Nueva Zelanda esta semana, contiene en 66 capítulos datos completos y exhaustivos de unas 9.000 especies, así como 800 mapas y 100 fotografías en color. Se han recopilado datos sobre la presencia, evolución, cambios genéticos y efectos del cambio climático sobre todos ellos.

  • La base de datos describe desde microorganismos hasta grandes cetáceos
  • Más de un centenar de científicos ha trabajado en el atlas durante cuatro años
  • Aún quedan fuera la descripción de entre 1.000 y 2.000 especies
  • Primer capítulo está disponible gratis
  • MÁS EN iATLAS
BALLOONS BLOW… DON’T LET THEM GO!!!

All released balloons, including those falsely marketed as “biodegradable latex”, return to Earth as ugly litter.  They kill countless animals & cause dangerous power outages. Balloons are also a waste of Helium, a finite resource. Balloons can travel thousands of miles & pollute the most remote & pristine places.
Photo by Rich Stallcup- A Black-footed Albatross encounters a floating balloon. Albatrosses and other Procellariids often ingest or become entangled in floating debris they encounter at sea
more at Balloons Blow

BALLOONS BLOW… DON’T LET THEM GO!!!

All released balloons, including those falsely marketed as “biodegradable latex”, return to Earth as ugly litter.  They kill countless animals & cause dangerous power outages. Balloons are also a waste of Helium, a finite resource. Balloons can travel thousands of miles & pollute the most remote & pristine places.

  • Photo by Rich Stallcup- A Black-footed Albatross encounters a floating balloon. Albatrosses and other Procellariids often ingest or become entangled in floating debris they encounter at sea
  • more at Balloons Blow
conservationbiologist
conservationbiologist:

by Frans de Waal
LONELY WHALEIt has been tracked since 1992 and been labeled the loneliest whale in the world. It sings at a frequency of 51.75 Hz whereas others of it’s kind sing at 15 - 25 Hz. It does not travel along migration routes of any baleen whale species. There is no opportunity for other whales to run into it."The best guess of researchers is that this lonely whale is either a ‘deformed’ hybrid between 2 species of whale, or the last surviving member of an unknown species." - Impact Labhttp://factsnacks.blogspot.nl/2011/03/1-is-loneliest-number.html

conservationbiologist:

by Frans de Waal

LONELY WHALE

It has been tracked since 1992 and been labeled the loneliest whale in the world. It sings at a frequency of 51.75 Hz whereas others of it’s kind sing at 15 - 25 Hz. It does not travel along migration routes of any baleen whale species. There is no opportunity for other whales to run into it.

"The best guess of researchers is that this lonely whale is either a ‘deformed’ hybrid between 2 species of whale, or the last surviving member of an unknown species." - Impact Lab

http://factsnacks.blogspot.nl/2011/03/1-is-loneliest-number.html

mamitah
What most people don’t know, that they should, is that practically every food you buy in a store for consumption by humans is genetically modified food. There are no wild seedless watermelons, there’s no wild cows, there’s no long-stem roses growing in the wild …

We have systematically genetically modified all the foods, the vegetables and animals, that we have eaten ever since we cultivated them. It’s called artificial selection. That’s how we genetically modify them. So now that we can do it in a lab, all of a sudden, you’re going to complain?

So we are creating and modifying the biology of the world to serve our needs. I don’t have a problem with that because we’ve been doing that for tens of thousands of years. So, chill out.

Neil deGrasse Tyson to anti-GMO advocates  (via micdotcom)

markscherz you do know the huge difference between selective breeding (artificial selection) and genetic engineering, right?

I like Tyson as much as the next science enthusiast, but he is being deliberately obtuse and clouding the issue here.

Have you ever watched Orphan Black? Or any other sci fi / speculative fiction about the moral quandaries of patenting biological life? Have you seen the way intellectual property works in the pharmaceutical industry when life-saving drugs can’t be rolled out to people in time?

It’s the fact that if you buy a GMO plant, you can’t legally take cuttings from it or propagate it by seed, even when it is fertile or able to be cultivated asexually. You purchase the means of production, but a legal restriction that patents the genes of that plant prevents you from ever re-using it or re-sowing it, even if you have the competency or need to do so.

Also you risk gene flow into other populations when you grow it. GMOs have also contributed to pesticide resistance, and an increase in secondary pests among common crops like cotton and corn. These phenomena are well-documented, and not at all the ravings of a mad suburbanite going on about tumours in rats. There is also very little evidence of the promised improved harvests.

I think most people could get behind responsible genetic engineering, but right now it’s in the hands of some lawsuit happy multinationals, and it’s intimately tied with outmoded monoculture farming practices, that have proven again and again to be harmful to biodiversity and habitats.

I’m no luddite: I’d actively call myself a futurist and a transhumanist. I usually welcome change, but I usually fall in the anti-GMO camp because I support open-source technology and I oppose patents on biological organisms that can reproduce. It’s hardly the unscientific stance it’s been made out to be, and I don’t think it should be dismissed out of hand, especially by someone like Tyson who is being deliberately dishonest about the chasm between selective breeding and genetic engineering.

Hell, I saw you are against hybridising snakes because of ethical issues. Some people have ethical reasons to oppose handing over the future of the world’s food supply to a few multinationals.

(via hyggehaven)

(via mamitah)

Also called the American oystercatcher, the American Pied Oystercatcher (Haematopus palliatus) can be found along coastal areas of North America from New England southward down to Brazil, Uruguay and Argentina. It also occurs on the Pacific coast of California, Mexico, Central America, Peru, and Chile.

The genus name for this species refers to the red of the beak, Haeme = red, atopus = atypical, the species epithet palliata = cloaked. As the common name suggests, these birds feed upon oysters and other shellfish, including mussels and clams.They will also consume other marine invertebrates like limpets, sea urchins, starfish, crabs, and worms.

  • Photo byremco.douma/ProjectNoah