Back to Top
RARE BEAKED WHALE FOUND DEAD I.5 KM FROM SHORELINE IN ARGENTINA

The Arnoux beaked whale (Berardius arnuxii), which inhabits deep ocean areas, was found dead in Rio de la Plata, Buenos Aires. the animal’s body floated, and entered through the channels due to the flow. It is very unusual for these animals appear on the Buenos Aires coast. Even this species has the last record sighting in 1920.
One of the largest beaked whale, is almost identical in appeareance to its close relative, Baird’s beaked whale (B. bairdii) but is smaller in size, its body is uniform blackish-brown or dark grey. this one was 6.4 m.

 via Diario Veloz

RARE BEAKED WHALE FOUND DEAD I.5 KM FROM SHORELINE IN ARGENTINA

The Arnoux beaked whale (Berardius arnuxii), which inhabits deep ocean areas, was found dead in Rio de la Plata, Buenos Aires. the animal’s body floated, and entered through the channels due to the flow. It is very unusual for these animals appear on the Buenos Aires coast. Even this species has the last record sighting in 1920.

One of the largest beaked whale, is almost identical in appeareance to its close relative, Baird’s beaked whale (B. bairdii) but is smaller in size, its body is uniform blackish-brown or dark grey. this one was 6.4 m.

➜ 10 Things You Can Do to Save the Ocean
  • 1. Mind Your Carbon Footprint and Reduce Energy Consumption

Reduce the effects of climate change on the ocean by leaving the car at home when you can and being conscious of your energy use at home and work. A few things you can do to get started today: Switch to compact fluorescent light bulbs, take the stairs, and bundle up or use a fan to avoid oversetting your thermostat.

Global fish populations are rapidly being depleted due to demand, loss of habitat, and unsustainable fishing practices. When shopping or dining out, help reduce the demand for overexploited species by choosing seafood that is both healthful and sustainable.

  • 3. Use Fewer Plastic Products

Plastics that end up as ocean debris contribute to habitat destruction and entangle and kill tens of thousands of marine animals each year. To limit your impact, carry a reusable water bottle, store food in nondisposable containers, bring your own cloth tote or other reusable bag when shopping, and recycle whenever possible.

  • 4. Help Take Care of the Beach

Whether you enjoy diving, surfing, or relaxing on the beach, always clean up after yourself. Explore and appreciate the ocean without interfering with wildlife or removing rocks and coral. Go even further by encouraging others to respect the marine environment or by participating in local beach cleanups.

  • 5. Don’t Purchase Items That Exploit Marine Life

Certain products contribute to the harming of fragile coral reefs and marine populations. Avoid purchasing items such as coral jewelry, tortoiseshell hair accessories (made from hawksbill turtles), and shark products.

  • 6. Be an Ocean-Friendly Pet Owner

Read pet food labels and consider seafood sustainability when choosing a diet for your pet. Never flush cat litter, which can contain pathogens harmful to marine life. Avoid stocking your aquarium with wild-caught saltwater fish, and never release any aquarium fish into the ocean or other bodies of water, a practice that can introduce non-native species harmful to the existing ecosystem.

  • 7. Support Organizations Working to Protect the Ocean

Many institutes and organizations are fighting to protect ocean habitats and marine wildlife. Find a national organization and consider giving financial support or volunteering for hands-on work or advocacy. If you live near the coast, join up with a local branch or group and get involved in projects close to home.

  • 8. Influence Change in Your Community

Research the ocean policies of public officials before you vote or contact your local representatives to let them know you support marine conservation projects. Consider patronizing restaurants and grocery stores that offer only sustainable seafood, and speak up about your concerns if you spot a threatened species on the menu or at the seafood counter.

  • 9. Travel the Ocean Responsibly

Practice responsible boating, kayaking, and other recreational activities on the water. Never throw anything overboard, and be aware of marine life in the waters around you. If you’re set on taking a cruise for your next vacation, do some research to find the most eco-friendly option.

  • 10. Educate Yourself About Oceans and Marine Life

All life on Earth is connected to the ocean and its inhabitants. The more you learn about the issues facing this vital system, the more you’ll want to help ensure its health—then share that knowledge to educate and inspire others.

A magnificent juvenile Wandering Albatross, unseasonal off the South African coast during summer

A magnificent juvenile Wandering Albatross, unseasonal off the South African coast during summer

Un ejemplar  Sifio de Cuvier (Ziphius cavirostris) nadando bajo la superficie en las Islas Galápagos.
Foto de Tui De Roy/ MINDEN PICTURES/CORBIS

Un ejemplar  Sifio de Cuvier (Ziphius cavirostris) nadando bajo la superficie en las Islas Galápagos.

  • Foto de Tui De Roy/ MINDEN PICTURES/CORBIS
conservationbiologist:

!!!

YESSSS

EVOLUCIÓN Y PALEONTOLOGIA: AVES (11:48) 

EXPLORA CONICYT y MNHN

Las aves pertenecen a una de las clases animales más evolucionadas del planeta. Sus formas, colores y capacidad de volar, entre otras características, son producto de miles de años de evolución. Hoy sabemos que son sobrevivientes de la primera extinción masiva de fauna de la era de los dinosaurios. Este capítulo nos ayudará a responder la pregunta ¿Son las aves dinosaurios?

THE SOUTHERN AFRICAN BRYDE’S WHALE PROJECT 2013

cgintothesea:

image

I still can’t believe it: I’m going to work on the South African Bryde’s Whale Project with a team of marine mammal scientists based at the Cape Town branch of the Mammal Research Institute of the University of Pretoria.

I’ve just arrived at the airport and I’m both excited and thoughtful about what will happen to me. The first person I get to know is Gwenith, who will become Gwen for us soon. She is the principal researcher. She has a PhD on the Bryde’s whale and eight years experience in the field, laboratory and analytical techniques for studying marine mammals. There’s another intern like me: Ursula, a swiss woman with a solid background in cetaceans field, especially Minke’s whales.

After checking everything, we’re ready to start our first day. Meredith, an excellent skipper and boat technician with so many years experience in marine conservation and research, is the fourth woman. It’s 7.30 a.m. and, as usual, we’re on the vessel, a RHIB named “Balaena”. We take off the nots of the rope and go off sea.

I’ve just seen so many cetacean species for the first time: common dolphins, humpback whales, southern right whales and the most elusive whale we’re looking for, the Bryde’s Whale.

This baleen whale had previously been confused with the sei whale. This new species has been named “Balaenoptera Brydei” after Johan Bryde, the norvegian consul to South Africa, who set up the first whaling station in Durban. Bryde’s whales are middle sized balaenopterids. There’re a number of unique characteristics that distinguish them from other balaenopterids; the most notable being 3 prominent rostral ridges, 1 central and 2 lateral sub-ridges, that extend from the tip of the snout to just before the blowholes. Their ventral grooves extend back from the lower jaw to the umbilicus. They have a prominent, falcate dorsal fin situated 2/3 of the way down the body. The body is dark, smoky gray dorsally, becoming gradually lighter, yellowish-white ventrally. Their length, once fully grown, is between 12 to 15 m with an apparent sexual dimorphism. Females are larger than males by about 0,5 m. The International Whaling Commission currently recognizes 11 stocks of Bryde’s whale. These whales are found in a lot of tropical and temperate waters, they’ve been recorded in the oceans between 40° N and 40° S. Off South Africa there is a bimodal distribution, with a high abundance in the coldest water between 12° C and 13° C, and a secondary peak in abundance at about 18° C to 19° C. This supports the evidence for 2 sub-populations of Bryde’s whale with different habitat requirements. It’s unlikely that water temperature affects their distribution - the the abundance of prey is probably more important.

Writing about Bryde’s whale remind me of a special day, probably the last one. I was on the sighting tower and a Bryde’s approached very close to our boat. So fascinating! The animal was so close to us and the water was so clear and shallow that I was able to see the entire body. What a breath taking moment! Bryde’s are very elusive and it was a special gift for us. Studying them is really hard, especially if researchers, like us, have to shoot the animals with a crossbow to capture biopsy samples from their blubber, the cetacean fat skin. Once we manage that, we need to process the sample, transfering, labelling and preserving the genetic material. So, it was both photo-ID and genetic study. 

Another encounter will stay forever in my mind. I have been in South Africa for a few days. An unforgettable sighting: a fight between two humpback whales males to win over a female. A lot of tails and flippers lapping. A huge amount of water rising up from the surface. Before that day, I’d only ever seen scenes like this in documentaries. A tear on my face is mandatory, unavoidable. I’ve been dreaming about whale breaches since I was young. When I have the chance to see these animals I remember the reason I’m studying marine biology. An unwavering enthusiasm envelops me and everything disappears. Like by magic.

I can write hundreds of pages about many incredible sightings we had. It’s such a tough thing to do because you should be here to really understand the emotion and the satisfaction we have at the end of each day. Falling asleep after a tiring work day like these ones. And the next day, when the alarm sounds again to wake us up, ready for another adventure.

Many thanks to Gwen for giving me this meaningful opportunity of being part of this project and for giving me the possibility to meet Ken Findlay, the director of the Whale Unit at the University of Pretoria, as well as the supervisor of the project. Peter Best, advisor and extraordinary professor, who I had the chance to get to know too. A special thank goes also to Meredith, Ursula, Ian and Steve, two funny and helpful guys who have helped us on boat for many weekends. Thanks to everyone for making this experience unforgettable.

 image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

please, let me join your project I will work for food and a place to sleep.

Size comparison between Cameroceras and Man 

Cameroceras (“chambered horn”) is a genus of extinct, giant orthoconic cephalopod that lived during the Ordovician period, 470 to 460 million years ago.

Art from Kawasaki Satoshi.

Size comparison between Cameroceras and Man 

Cameroceras (“chambered horn”) is a genus of extinct, giant orthoconic cephalopod that lived during the Ordovician period, 470 to 460 million years ago.

  • Art from Kawasaki Satoshi.
52thesearch:

The rising tide of noise due to dramatic growth in shipping traffic has increased a hundredfold since 1960. This infographic shows how it disrupts ocean life.

52thesearch:

The rising tide of noise due to dramatic growth in shipping traffic has increased a hundredfold since 1960. This infographic shows how it disrupts ocean life.

Common Dolphins (Delphinus capensis) finishing off a bait ball 
photo: Paul Cowell 

Common Dolphins (Delphinus capensis) finishing off a bait ball 

The unique three-pronged shape of the dinoflagellate Ceratium tripos makes it easy to identify among the phytoplankton, where it is one of the dominant organisms. Although this species is usually solitary, several individuals may be seen together, attached to each other by the single apical horn. This occurs when a cell divides and the daughter cells remain linked in short chains. Ceratium tripos is sometimes parasitized by other protists.
Photo:Keisotyo, Wikimedia Commons

The unique three-pronged shape of the dinoflagellate Ceratium tripos makes it easy to identify among the phytoplankton, where it is one of the dominant organisms. Although this species is usually solitary, several individuals may be seen together, attached to each other by the single apical horn. This occurs when a cell divides and the daughter cells remain linked in short chains. Ceratium tripos is sometimes parasitized by other protists.

  • Photo:Keisotyo, Wikimedia Commons
miniminke:

Did you know whales and dolphins are in the same order?
The order is called Cetacea.
     Suborder Mysticeti have baleen (whales).
     Suborder Odontoceti are toothed (whales and dolphins).
(image from http://www.whalematch.org)

miniminke:

Did you know whales and dolphins are in the same order?

  • The order is called Cetacea.
  •      Suborder Mysticeti have baleen (whales).
  •      Suborder Odontoceti are toothed (whales and dolphins).

(image from http://www.whalematch.org)

DO HUMPBACK WHALES USE THE STARS TO NAVIGATE?

DailyMail  04:04 GMT, 21 April 2011

Humpback whales can travel thousands of miles deep underwater in an astonishingly straight line - and the sun, moon and stars may be why they never get lost.

Scientists used satellite technology to track 16 tagged whales as they migrated thousands of kilometres northwards from the South Atlantic and South Pacific - but could not work out how they manage to navigate their way through the ocean’s turbulent waters with such accuracy.

But it has now emerged the huge mammals may use a combination of the sun’s position, Earth’s magnetism and even star maps to guide their journeys, which can up 10,000 miles long.

Experts say humpbacks never deviate more than about five degrees from their migration courses.

Most of the whales in the experiment, which were tracked between 2003 and 2010, maintained an almost dead-straight course, deviating by less than one degree - despite the effects of weather and ocean currents.

Writing in the Royal Society journal Biology Letters, Travis Horton from the University of Canterbury said: ‘They are orienting with something outside of themselves, not something internal.

Most long-distance travelling animals are believed to navigate using a compass based either on the Earth’s magnetic field, or the position of the sun.

But neither method can account for the extraordinary navigational ability of humpback whales, said the scientists, and they suspect the mammals use a combination of all three to find their way.

They said the earth’s magnetism varies too widely to explain the straight lines and solar navigation needs reference points not available in the water.

i recently discovered this, isn’t his tongue, in fact, is his stomach.
In sharks, stomach is J-shaped, is large and expandable, allowing storage of large amounts of food. This is vital to oceanic shark, whose dams are widely scattered, so it can spend days and days with nothing to put in their mouths. 
The stomach ends in a constriction, the pylorus, a ring of muscle that contracts and relaxes at intervals to allow the transit of food into the intestine. It also acts as sieve against the passage of those difficult or impossible stuff to digest as bones and shells. These materials are accumulated until the shark everting its stomach, that is, turning like a bag. 
In many species the stomach literally goes through their mouth until completely empty. Sometimes this occurs spontaneously when the animal is subjected to heavy stress, such as when you capture. Some argue that it may be a defensive maneuver: the debris cloud that forms in the water serve to distract a potential predator, or perhaps as a repellent
coool

i recently discovered this, isn’t his tongue, in fact, is his stomach.

In sharks, stomach is J-shaped, is large and expandable, allowing storage of large amounts of food. This is vital to oceanic shark, whose dams are widely scattered, so it can spend days and days with nothing to put in their mouths. 

The stomach ends in a constriction, the pylorus, a ring of muscle that contracts and relaxes at intervals to allow the transit of food into the intestine. It also acts as sieve against the passage of those difficult or impossible stuff to digest as bones and shells. These materials are accumulated until the shark everting its stomach, that is, turning like a bag. 

In many species the stomach literally goes through their mouth until completely empty. Sometimes this occurs spontaneously when the animal is subjected to heavy stress, such as when you capture. Some argue that it may be a defensive maneuver: the debris cloud that forms in the water serve to distract a potential predator, or perhaps as a repellent

coool

THEME BY PARTI