Marinero de Agua Dulce

Marine science, biology of the seas, some dissident info and riot are here
spermatheca:

Empty egg cases of the octopus Graneledone boreopacifica. Scientists recently discovered that Graneledone boreopacifica cares for its broods for up to 4 and a half years, the longest egg-brooding time of any animal.
Reference (Open access): :Robison et al. 2014, Deep-sea octopus (Graneledone boreopacifica) conducts the longest-known egg-brooding period of any animal. PLoS ONE 9
Image and information via. this original post

spermatheca:

Empty egg cases of the octopus Graneledone boreopacifica. Scientists recently discovered that Graneledone boreopacifica cares for its broods for up to 4 and a half years, the longest egg-brooding time of any animal.

  • Reference (Open access): :Robison et al. 2014, Deep-sea octopus (Graneledone boreopacifica) conducts the longest-known egg-brooding period of any animal. PLoS ONE 9

Image and information via. this original post

AWESOME: DEEP-SEA OCTOPUS CARES FOR HER EGGS FOR 4.5 YEARS

Researchers at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) have observed a deep-sea octopus brooding its eggs for four and one half years—longer than any other known animal. Throughout this time, the female kept the eggs clean and guarded them from predators. This amazing feat represents an evolutionary balancing act between the benefits to the young octopuses of having plenty of time to develop within their eggs, and their mother’s ability to survive for years with little or no food. Although long-term observations of deep-sea animals are rare, the researchers propose that extended brooding periods may be common in the deep sea. Such extended life stages would need to be taken into account in assessing the effects of human activities on deep-sea animals. In any case, this strategy has apparently worked for Graneledone boreopacifica—it is one of the most common deep-sea octopuses in the Northeastern Pacific.

Close-up of the egg capsules in December, 2010

Empty egg cases, October 2011.

  • Reference (Open access): :Robison et al. 2014, Deep-sea octopus (Graneledone boreopacifica) conducts the longest-known egg-brooding period of any animal. PLoS ONE 9
  • video: MBARI
sciencealert:

This is a fluorescence microscopic image of a squid embryo, which is smaller than a pea. In the image you can see its eyes, four arms and tiny suction cups.
Image: Celeste M. Nelson/2014 Art of Science Competition

sciencealert:

This is a fluorescence microscopic image of a squid embryo, which is smaller than a pea. In the image you can see its eyes, four arms and tiny suction cups.

  • Image: Celeste M. Nelson/2014 Art of Science Competition

WAKING UP IN THE MORNING

whatshouldwecallgradschool:

HOW I WISH I FELT:

image

HOW I ACTUALLY FEEL:

image

Hi new followers, that’s me !giving a little kiss a the extinct Yangtze River Dolphin (Lipotes vexillifer)

by the way, if you have an interesting blog, let me know to follow you :)

birdandmoon:

A year ago I got to illustrate one of the endings in Ryan North’s brilliant Hamlet choose-your-own-path book To Be or Not To Be. These are all things you may be able to find outside right now (if you can bear to put down this amazing book).

birdandmoon:

A year ago I got to illustrate one of the endings in Ryan North’s brilliant Hamlet choose-your-own-path book To Be or Not To Be. These are all things you may be able to find outside right now (if you can bear to put down this amazing book).

The Desertas petrel (Pterodroma deserta) is a small seabird in the gadfly petrel genus which breeds on Bugio Island in the Desertas off Madeira, Portugal, and now, sadly, is one of the 87 new species listed as Vulnerable

Read more at mongabay

The Desertas petrel (Pterodroma deserta) is a small seabird in the gadfly petrel genus which breeds on Bugio Island in the Desertas off Madeira, Portugal, and now, sadly, is one of the 87 new species listed as Vulnerable

A mother southern right whale and her young white calf spend time in Proper Bay near Port Lincoln. 
Picture: Marianne Stockham

A mother southern right whale and her young white calf spend time in Proper Bay near Port Lincoln.

  • Picture: Marianne Stockham

The deep seafloor is generally considered to be quite food poor away from the seep areas. This leads to a series of adaptations in the animals living there. Here we see a swimming sea cucumber (Enypniastes sp) evolved from benthic animals that feed upon the sediment.

In pelagic species such as the Sea Cucumber (Order Elasipodida, family Pelagothuriidae) are capable of swimming over the seafloor using highly-modified feet that have turned into fins. If you look closely you can see the mud-filled gut inside the semi-transparent animal. When it finds a suitable spots it will drop to the bottom to feed on the sediment and then swim away again to find another suitable spot

Ohta produced this excellent diagram showing the swimming behavior of Enypniastes relative to the direction of the current and the swimming behavior/motion/actions of the animal. 

inside the jelly, Cyanea capillata gonads (yellow parts) in oral lobes.

  • awesome photographs by Alexander Semenov

volk-morya ha dicho: Top 5 favorite marine animals?

Only 5?  =( not again!

grapefruitjews ha dicho: What is your favorite prehistoric creature and why? :D

are you asking for just one? =( i will say two

there a important place for Pachycephalosaurus and Pakicetus. The first looks like a dragon and the second is our dog that preceded whales

imageimage

Using infrared lighting, a live-streaming, high-definition “turtle webcam" positioned on a beach in the Florida Keys recorded the hatch of about 100 baby loggerhead sea turtles on Friday, July 25, just before 9 p.m.
The 3-inch-long babies erupted from a hole, came out en masse and headed to the Atlantic Ocean under dim moonlight.

The camera uses infrared lighting so hatchlings won’t be confused by artificial light and will go to sea — guided by moonlight reflecting on the water — instead of pushing further onto land.

australianorca:

Want to learn more about the Australian whale migration? Head over to http://www.wildaboutwhales.com.au/ where you can read up on info, and download their sighting app!

(vía trynottodrown)

astronomy-to-zoology:

Genus: Gigantactis
…is a genus of Whipnose Anglers (Gigantactinidae) which occur in most oceans, at deep depths of around 1,000-2,500 meters (3,300-8,200 ft). Like their namesake suggests members of Gigantactis posses elongated Illicium (their “lures”) with bioluminescent photophores at their end. In typical angler fashion these are used to lure prey into striking distance. 
Classification
Animalia-Chordata-Actinopterygii-Lophiiformes-Gigantactinidae-Gigantactis
Image: Theodore W. Pietsch 

astronomy-to-zoology:

Genus: Gigantactis

is a genus of Whipnose Anglers (Gigantactinidae) which occur in most oceans, at deep depths of around 1,000-2,500 meters (3,300-8,200 ft). Like their namesake suggests members of Gigantactis posses elongated Illicium (their “lures”) with bioluminescent photophores at their end. In typical angler fashion these are used to lure prey into striking distance. 

Classification

Animalia-Chordata-Actinopterygii-Lophiiformes-Gigantactinidae-Gigantactis

Image: Theodore W. Pietsch